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Data Security & Fraud Prevention Roundup – December 19th, 2014

by Futurex on December 19th, 2014

Our Data Security & Fraud Prevention Roundup contain links to the best data security and fraud prevention-related articles, blog posts, news releases, interviews, and anything else that we found interesting from around the web over the course of the last few weeks and our thoughts on them.

#1: Intel’s McAfee Labs makes its security threat predictions for 2015 – singles out IoT by Gary Sims, Android Authority (December 10, 2014)

The 2015 Threat Predictions report has been released, and it has some interesting insight into what organizations can expect for the coming year. If you don’t want to sift through the entire report, tech writer Gary Sims has outlined the highlights, which include mobile security and the Internet of Things.

#2: Top 5 Things You’ll See in Cloud Platforms in 2015 by Allan Leinwand, Business 2 Community (December 10, 2014)

There’s no doubt that the cloud will continue to grow and evolve in 2015, with businesses and end users alike adopting cloud services to add convenience to every aspect of their lives. So how will things change in 2015? Allan Leinwand thinks there are 5 main developments likely to occur.

#3: Data Security in 2015 for Banks, HIPAA Covered Entities, and Small Business Too by Joseph J. Lazzarotti, The National Law Review (December 12, 2014)

What new developments in data security regulations and laws can businesses expect to see in 2015? Certified Information Privacy Professional Joseph J. Lazzarotti breaks down the latest in announcements regarding data security legislation for the upcoming year.

#4: The future of security: 11 predictions for 2015 by Taylor Armerding, CSO Online (December 15, 2014)

When it comes to predicting changes to data security in 2015, everyone has an opinion. This article combines the data security forecasts from the Gartner and Forrester research firms as well as RSA’s executive chairman in one simplified list.

#5: 6 Issues Surrounding IoT Security in 2015 by Eleanor Burns, Computer Business Review (December 16, 2014)

One thing end consumers will definitely see more of is the increasing popularity of internet-connected devices. The question on many businesses’ minds is whether they are ready to take all the steps necessary to secure their endpoints. Eleanor Burns discusses the six main considerations regarding this hot topic.

If you find something interesting that you’d like to see considered for our next Data Security & Fraud Prevention Roundup, don’t hesitate to let us know. We’re always on the lookout for new and interesting perspectives on data security news, issues, thoughts, and best practices. Send your best links to info@futurex.com, or share them with us on Twitter (@Futurex).


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People, Process, and Technology: A Proven Mix

by Rachel Barnett on December 15th, 2014

What makes Futurex such a successful company? We believe it is the direct result of our innovative methodology that focuses on the excellence and efficiency of three areas: People, Process, and Technology. Futurex’s business model is centralized around developing superior products, maintaining robust quality assurance, and implementing successful custom initiatives for Tier-1 organizations around the globe.

The People

Throughout the process of analyzing our customers’ core cryptographic infrastructures, implementing our solutions, and maintaining 24x7x365 support, our focus stays on the customer’s needs. By employing skilled and experienced individuals, we’re able to provide our customers with a level of support that consistently exceeds expectations. Futurex’s Solutions Architects are involved with enterprises at the outset of the system analysis process, understanding their specific ecosystem and business objectives, to the solution deployment and beyond. Solution Architects make up Futurex’s Xceptional Support team, which has one of the lowest support escalation rates in the industry, with the vast majority of calls resolved by the first team member to respond.

The Process

When it comes to the security of your core cryptographic infrastructure, a black box solution won’t cut it. Our methodology for implementing our technology into your unique system begins with a thorough analysis of your needs, covering everything from locations of data centers to average TPS ratings. Once our Solutions Architects have a clear idea of your environment’s requirements, we can start developing a custom solution encompassing everything from new API commands to hardware modifications. After design, your new technology will go through extensive testing, with full support during both the testing and post-deployment time frames.

The Technology

Robust hardware that is FIPS 140-2 Level 3-validated forms the backbone of Futurex’s Hardened Enterprise Security Platform. Futurex technology is based around a common code base that enables functionality to be easily implemented into multiple product lines, creating a full solution suite that meets every need of your organization’s core cryptographic infrastructure. With support for all major algorithms and key types and a strong commitment to maintaining compliance with current and emerging regulatory requirements, Futurex’s technology is reliable both today and in the future.

Want to know more about Futurex’s business methodology? Download our “People, Process, Technology” whitepaper.


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Data Security & Fraud Prevention Roundup – December 5th, 2014

by Futurex on December 5th, 2014

Our Data Security & Fraud Prevention Roundup contain links to the best data security and fraud prevention-related articles, blog posts, news releases, interviews, and anything else that we found interesting from around the web over the course of the last few weeks and our thoughts on them.

#1: The data security threat from former employees by Steve Anderson, World Economic Forum (November 19, 2014)

Every organization has to deal with procedures that come with terminating an employee, but an issue not frequently addressed is the efficacy of those policies in securing sensitive business information. This article outlines ways in which companies can restrict unauthorized system access after employee termination.

#2: The 12-Step Program for Information Security by Scott M Fulton III, Datacenter Dynamics (November 26, 2014)

We are all aware that best information security practices are absolutely imperative for every type of organization right now. New laws, certifications, and regulations are being created almost daily, and it is becoming increasingly significant for companies to fully realize their information security plan. This article outlines topics from general business practices to more specific regulatory actions that companies should be aware of.

#3: Q&A: Internet Encryption As the New Normal by Kelly Jackson Higgins, Dark Reading (December 1, 2014)

Wondering how the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) feels about encryption? Wonder no more! The IAB issued a statement regarding day-to-day encryption standards on the internet, and here’s how they believe the up-and-coming regulations will affect businesses as well as consumers.

#4: Top 3 security, privacy and data protection trends for 2015 by Cameron Burke, Help Net Security (December 4, 2014)

2014 held security breaches for many industries as well as the rise of cloud computing and the start of legislation – what will 2015 bring? Cameron Burke predicts a sharper impact of government jurisdiction no matter what country, a greater confidence in the security of the cloud, and a heightened awareness of data loss prevention. So what does that mean for your company.

#5: Health Data Security Valued Over Convenience, Says Report by Elizabeth Snell, HealthITSecurity (December 4, 2014)

Convenience versus security: which one is more important? Businesses have been contemplating this question for years, but a new report by PwC’s Health Research Institute states that the end consumer is more likely to value the safety of their sensitive data than the ease with which it can be accessed.

If you find something interesting that you’d like to see considered for our next Data Security & Fraud Prevention Roundup, don’t hesitate to let us know. We’re always on the lookout for new and interesting perspectives on data security news, issues, thoughts, and best practices. Send your best links to info@futurex.com, or share them with us on Twitter (@Futurex).


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Key Management Refresher: The Importance of Education

by Futurex on December 1st, 2014

For any organization managing encryption keys, the process of creating, maintaining, and improving a key management system can seem a frustrating or even impossible task. These feelings of frustration often stem from a few prominent mistakes that frequently occur. Beyond simple annoyance with an inefficient system, key management mistakes can have a far more damaging effect: data breaches.   Fortunately, these mistakes are easily preventable with some instruction. In our whitepaper, Ten Key Management Mistakes…And How to Avoid Them, we discuss ten actions that can make or break a key management system.

A recent study titled “Security Awareness Training: It’s Not Just for Compliance” has revealed that 56% of corporate employees have never received security or policy awareness training from their organizations. This means that more than half of employees are doing their jobs without fully understanding the security risks they could be causing. Is it any wonder that 35% of global data breaches are caused by a negligent employee or contractor? That’s what the Ponemon 2013 Cost of a Data Breach Study has stated, along with the sobering fact that a single breached record in the US costs an average of $188. Multiply that number by an average of 23,647 breached records per organization, and you’ll soon realize just how much a lack of employee education can cost.

When implementing a data security educational system into an IT infrastructure, there are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Make it engaging: Don’t just send out a memo saying “You must now do these things that will likely add on to your workload.” Try out a “Lunch-and-Learn” system in which employees actually want to attend, instead of resentfully feel obligated. Rather than make the Lunch-and-Learn a lecture, turn it into more of an interactive event. The more your employees are engaged in the presentation, the more likely they will be to remember and follow the steps learned.
  • Make it relevant: Employees are much more likely to follow data security policies if they understand why those policies are in place. Let them know what is at stake and how their actions can realistically impact the organization.
  • Make it consistent: Go into training sessions with a set plan. No employee is going to take data security policies seriously if their training is followed the next day by a memo stating “Never mind. Do this instead.”

Remember that data security education is relevant not only to employees; stakeholders can make or break the strength of an IT infrastructure. Keeping stakeholders informed about issues such as compliance mandates, current resources allocated to data security, plans for the future, and the problems faced by your unique system will make stakeholders far more likely to advocate for stronger data security.

Want to know more about key management best practices? Download our whitepaper or contact us today.


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